SFVaughn
Alaska Moved

This just in… John McCain hopes this makes up for bringing Sarah Palin to the national political scene and the national healing process can begin.

Alaska Moved

This just in… John McCain hopes this makes up for bringing Sarah Palin to the national political scene and the national healing process can begin.

calumet412:

Early “color” photograph looking north on Michigan Ave from 9th Street, 1931, Chicago
National Geographic

calumet412:

Early “color” photograph looking north on Michigan Ave from 9th Street, 1931, Chicago

National Geographic

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Up Close and Personal
Photo by Aung Thu Lwin (Bangkok, Thailand); Bangkok, Thailand

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Up Close and Personal

Photo by Aung Thu Lwin (Bangkok, Thailand); Bangkok, Thailand

calumet412:

Broadway, Clark and Diversey, 1925, Chicago.

calumet412:

Broadway, Clark and Diversey, 1925, Chicago.

todaysdocument:

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Modesto Cartagena, the most decorated Hispanic soldier of the Korean War
Today we remember Modesto Cartagena, the most decorated Hispanic soldier of the Korean War.

Korean War veteran, Sgt. 1st Class (ret) Modesto Cartagena, 12/02/2000. (National Archives Identifier: 6519402)

Cartagena was a humble man born to a poor family who lived in the small town of Cayey, Puerto Rico. He was among the first from the island to volunteer for military service when the United States entered World War II. He served in the 65th Infantry Regiment, an all-Puerto Rican regiment also known as “The Borinqueneers,” during World War II and later in the Korean War. 
During the Korean War, Cartagena earned the nickname “One Man Army.” Hill 206 near Yonchon, Korea, was heavily guarded on April 19, 1951, by a well-entrenched and fanatically determined hostile force. While under attack, Cartagena destroyed four enemy emplacements before he was wounded, thus saving the lives of the men in his unit and enabling the company to take the hill. 
Keep reading (and en español) at:  Prologue: Pieces of History » Modesto Cartagena, the most decorated Hispanic soldier of the Korean War / Modesto Cartagena el soldado hispano más condecorado de la Guerra de Corea. 

todaysdocument:

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Modesto Cartagena, the most decorated Hispanic soldier of the Korean War

Today we remember Modesto Cartagena, the most decorated Hispanic soldier of the Korean War.

Korean War veteran, Sgt. 1st Class (ret) Modesto Cartagena, 12/02/2000. (National Archives Identifier: 6519402)

Cartagena was a humble man born to a poor family who lived in the small town of Cayey, Puerto Rico. He was among the first from the island to volunteer for military service when the United States entered World War II. He served in the 65th Infantry Regiment, an all-Puerto Rican regiment also known as “The Borinqueneers,” during World War II and later in the Korean War.

During the Korean War, Cartagena earned the nickname “One Man Army.” Hill 206 near Yonchon, Korea, was heavily guarded on April 19, 1951, by a well-entrenched and fanatically determined hostile force. While under attack, Cartagena destroyed four enemy emplacements before he was wounded, thus saving the lives of the men in his unit and enabling the company to take the hill.

Keep reading (and en español) at:  Prologue: Pieces of History » Modesto Cartagena, the most decorated Hispanic soldier of the Korean War / Modesto Cartagena el soldado hispano más condecorado de la Guerra de Corea. 

calumet412:

N Alta Vista Terrace, 1907, Chicago.

Bounded by Seminary, Grace, Kenmore and Byron, this one block street was developed in 1904 to resemble London row houses. Now listed on the US National Register of Historic Places, this area of 40 homes has remained relatively untouched by urban renewal.

todaysdocument:

The First D-Day Documentary

D-Day to D plus 3
Series : Moving Images Relating to Military Activities, compiled 1947 - 1964. Record Group 111: Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, 1860 - 1985
(Compiled from multiple items)

Despite being cataloged, described, and housed at the National Archives for decades, the films created by the U.S. Military during World War II still hold unexpected surprises.

In a recent search for combat moving image footage to complement the Eisenhower Library’s commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the D-day landings, Steve Greene, the Special Media Holdings Coordinator for the Presidential Libraries System, identified four reels of a documentary on the landings prepared by the “SHAEF [Supreme Headquarter Allied Expeditionary Forces] Public Relations Division.”

These reels were assigned separate, nonsequential identifying numbers in the Army Signal Corps Film catalog, suggesting that the Army did not recognize them to be parts of single production. Rather than offering the perspective of a single combat photographer, the reels shifted perspective from the sea, to the air, to the beaches, suggesting careful editing to provide an overview. The 33 minutes of film were described on a shot card as “a compilation of some of the action that took place from D Day to Day Plus 3, 6-9 June 1944.” The production, with no ambient sound, music or effects, includes a single monotone narrator and gives the impression of a military briefing set to film.

This film is probably the first film documentary of the events of the first four days of the D-day assault, created within days of the invasion…

Keep Reading at The Unwritten Record » The First D-Day Documentary

todaysdocument:


"Books cannot be killed by fire. People die, but books never die. No man and no force can put thought in a concentration camp forever. No man and no force can take from the world the books that embody man’s eternal fight against tyranny. In this war, we know, books are weapons."
-Franklin D. Roosevelt
"Books are weapons in the war of ideas", 1941 - 1945
From the series: World War II Posters, 1942 - 1945

Banned Books Week is September 21 - 27, 2014

todaysdocument:

"Books cannot be killed by fire. People die, but books never die. No man and no force can put thought in a concentration camp forever. No man and no force can take from the world the books that embody man’s eternal fight against tyranny. In this war, we know, books are weapons."

-Franklin D. Roosevelt

"Books are weapons in the war of ideas", 1941 - 1945

From the series: World War II Posters, 1942 - 1945

Banned Books Week is September 21 - 27, 2014

nprmusic:

Happy birthday, John Coltrane! Hear a two-part audio documentary on the saxophone icon: Part 1, Part 2. 
Photo: Evening Standard/Getty Images

nprmusic:

Happy birthday, John Coltrane! Hear a two-part audio documentary on the saxophone icon: Part 1, Part 2

Photo: Evening Standard/Getty Images

calumet412:

Now showing at the Chicago Theater, Bebe Daniels in the silent film, A Kiss in a Taxi, 1927, Chicago

calumet412:

Now showing at the Chicago Theater, Bebe Daniels in the silent film, A Kiss in a Taxi, 1927, Chicago

nprmusic:

Nine Inch Nails frontman Trent Reznor and producer Atticus Ross continue to tease their upcoming soundtrack for the movie, Gone Girl

archivesfoundation:

Today in 1806, the pioneering Lewis and Clark expedition returned to St. Louis from their two-year trip to explore the American West. Join us October 18 for the next Archives Sleepover to explore some of the records from this famous expedition - and hear Meriwether Lewis tell the tale of encountering a grizzly bear! Lewis will be joined by Arctic explorer Matthew Hensen and an underwater archaeologist as campers dive into the diverse and exciting records at the National Archives before turning in to sleep next to the Declaration of Independence and US Constitution! Learn more or sign up for the last “History, Heroes & Treasures” Archives sleepover of the year on October 18 at archivesfoundation.org/sleepoverHistory, Heroes & Treasures is supported by the Foundation for the National Archives; John Hancock Financial; Occasions Caterers; Mars, Incorporated; American Heritage Chocolate®; and The Coca-Cola Company.

archivesfoundation:

Today in 1806, the pioneering Lewis and Clark expedition returned to St. Louis from their two-year trip to explore the American West. Join us October 18 for the next Archives Sleepover to explore some of the records from this famous expedition - and hear Meriwether Lewis tell the tale of encountering a grizzly bear!

Lewis will be joined by Arctic explorer Matthew Hensen and an underwater archaeologist as campers dive into the diverse and exciting records at the National Archives before turning in to sleep next to the Declaration of Independence and US Constitution!

Learn more or sign up for the last “History, Heroes & Treasures” Archives sleepover of the year on October 18 at archivesfoundation.org/sleepover

History, Heroes & Treasures is supported by the Foundation for the National Archives; John Hancock Financial; Occasions Caterers; Mars, Incorporated; American Heritage Chocolate®; and The Coca-Cola Company.

nyprarchives:

The Star Spangled Banner turns 200 this month. To commemorate, listen to the inimitable Oscar Brand explain (in 6 minutes) its origins from a sheep-shearing song to the national anthem.
(Photo of the flag that inspired the song courtesy of the Smithsonian Institute)

nyprarchives:

The Star Spangled Banner turns 200 this month. To commemorate, listen to the inimitable Oscar Brand explain (in 6 minutes) its origins from a sheep-shearing song to the national anthem.

(Photo of the flag that inspired the song courtesy of the Smithsonian Institute)

nprmusic:

sesamestreet:

Disco Snuffy has entered the building.

Happy Hump Day, y’all. 

nprmusic:

sesamestreet:

Disco Snuffy has entered the building.

Happy Hump Day, y’all. 

ourpresidents:

Eisenhower Dispatches Federal Troops to Enforce Desegregation

On September 24, 1957, The Little Rock Nine attended their first full day of classes after President Eisenhower ordered the dispatch of the 101st  Airborne Division of the U.S. Army to ensure the students’ safety and to uphold the law of the Supreme Court.

On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled in Brown vs. Topeka Board of Education that segregated schools are “inherently unequal.” In September 1957, as a result of that ruling, nine African-American students enrolled at Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas.

The ensuing struggle between segregationists and integrationists, the State of Arkansas and the federal government, President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus, has become known in modern American history as the “Little Rock Crisis.” The crisis gained world-wide attention. When Governor Faubus ordered the Arkansas National Guard to surround Central High School to keep the nine students from entering the school, President Eisenhower ordered the 101st Airborne Division into Little Rock.

The manuscript holdings of the Eisenhower Presidential Library contain a large amount of documentation on this historic test of the Brown vs. Topeka ruling and school integration.  See selections from the digital catalog here.

Photo: Little Rock Nine escorted into Central High School by U.S. Army 101st Airborne Division soldiers.  Courtesy of Central High Museum Historical Collections.

Documents: Press release, Executive Order 10730, Providing for the Removal of an Obstruction of Justice Within the State of Arkansas, September 24, 1957

-from the Eisenhower Library