SFVaughn
Levi’s Stadium traffic brutal after loss in home opener
“There’s a mountain lion looking in my window”

A mountain lion that looked in a woman’s window – long enough for her to snap a photo — and bear scat found near Fairfax in the Marin foothills provided two more stunning tales last week in a series of wildlife encounters in Northern California. Read more…

“There’s a mountain lion looking in my window”

A mountain lion that looked in a woman’s window – long enough for her to snap a photo — and bear scat found near Fairfax in the Marin foothills provided two more stunning tales last week in a series of wildlife encounters in Northern California. Read more…

Hopes for a Strong El Niño Fade in California

Hopes for a Strong El Niño Fade in California

Long-term weather forecasters say it is now unlikely that a strong El Niño will develop this fall, dimming hopes in California for heavy rains that might bring relief from a severe drought.

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49ers collapse in 4th quarter, lose Levi’s opener to Bears

49ers collapse in 4th quarter, lose Levi’s opener to Bears

Colin Kaepernick threw three interceptions, lost a fumble, lost his temper and, ultimately, was the biggest reason the 49ers lost a 17-point lead en route to a punch-in-the-gut 28-20 loss to the Bears on Sunday night.

Thanks in large part to Kaepernick’s largesse, Chicago stormed back from a 17-0 second-quarter hole and spoiled the celebration in the first regular-season game at Levi’s Stadium…

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In Tech News: Apple Releases Brief, Fleeting Moment Of Excitement

In Tech News: Apple Releases Brief, Fleeting Moment Of Excitement

Ending weeks of anticipation and intense speculation, tech giant Apple unveiled a short and fleeting moment of excitement to the general public Tuesday during a media event at its corporate headquarters.

In Tech News: Apple Releases Brief, Fleeting Moment Of Excitement http://t.co/FiGurhK5Lg pic.twitter.com/feOBZJzvCi

— The Onion (@TheOnion) September 13, 2014

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Dying of Ebola at the Hospital Door

Dying of Ebola at the Hospital Door

Monrovia, the Liberian capital, is facing a widespread Ebola epidemic, and as the number of infected grows faster than hospital capacity, some patients wait outside near death.

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49ers suspend announcer Ted Robinson two games for domestic-violence comments
So the 49ers can suspend an announcer for insensitive remarks regarding domestic abuse but Ray McDonald plays Sunday? The 49ers and Jim Harbaugh are quickly losing creditability with their inability to deal with players with serious legal issues. Back in 2012 Harbaugh suspended Brandon Jacobsfor the final three games of the season after using social media to air his grievances about a lack of…

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Stuck at train crossing.

Stuck at train crossing.

13th Anniversay of 9/11
smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Ballooning in Bagan
Photo by Zay Yar Lin (Yangon, Myanmar); Bagan, Mandalay, Myanmar

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Ballooning in Bagan

Photo by Zay Yar Lin (Yangon, Myanmar); Bagan, Mandalay, Myanmar

americasgreatoutdoors:

St. Mary Falls in Glacier National Park.Photo: National Park Service

americasgreatoutdoors:

St. Mary Falls in Glacier National Park.

Photo: National Park Service


WWII: Europe: Lyon, France; “Nazi Snipers Scatter Lyon Crowd”, ca. 09/07/1944
From the series: Franklin D. Roosevelt Library Public Domain Photographs
americasgreatoutdoors:

Photo from the west side of May Lake in Yosemite National Park.Photo: National Park Service

americasgreatoutdoors:

Photo from the west side of May Lake in Yosemite National Park.

Photo: National Park Service

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Relaxed Red Fox
Photo by Christopher MacDonald (Brantford, ON, Canada); Ontario, Canada

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Relaxed Red Fox

Photo by Christopher MacDonald (Brantford, ON, Canada); Ontario, Canada

fordlibrarymuseum:

40th Anniversary of the Nixon Pardon: The Background
Concerned by the number of questions regarding Richard Nixon that came up during his first press conference on August 28, President Ford asked his White House Counsel Phil Buchen to quietly look into legal precedents for Presidential pardons. Benton Becker, a lawyer who had been involved in preparing for Ford’s Vice Presidential confirmation, assisted with the research.
Buchen and Becker consulted numerous sources, including The Federalist and court cases such as Burdick v. United States and Ex parte Garland. In their research they found that a President could issue a pardon before the recipient was formally charged and that the pardon did not have to name a specific crime.
Buchen also sought the opinion of Watergate Special Prosecutor Leon Jaworski regarding how long it be before prosecution of former President Nixon could occur as well as how long it might last. In his response written on September 4, Jaworski outlined the “unprecedented” circumstances surrounding the case. He estimated that the situation would “require a delay before selection of a jury is begun of a period from nine months to a year, and perhaps even longer.”
President Ford also talked about the possibility of a pardon with several key aides: Chief of staff Alexander Haig, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, and Counsellors Robert Hartmann and Jack Marsh. Due to the sensitivity of the topic the discussions were a closely held secret. After considering all of the research and opinions gathered, on September 7 he made the decision to pardon the former President.
Proclamation 4311, Granting Pardon to Richard Nixon, was typed up and placed in this envelope for President Ford to sign during a special announcement on Sunday, September 8, 1974.

fordlibrarymuseum:

40th Anniversary of the Nixon Pardon: The Background

Concerned by the number of questions regarding Richard Nixon that came up during his first press conference on August 28, President Ford asked his White House Counsel Phil Buchen to quietly look into legal precedents for Presidential pardons. Benton Becker, a lawyer who had been involved in preparing for Ford’s Vice Presidential confirmation, assisted with the research.

Buchen and Becker consulted numerous sources, including The Federalist and court cases such as Burdick v. United States and Ex parte Garland. In their research they found that a President could issue a pardon before the recipient was formally charged and that the pardon did not have to name a specific crime.

Buchen also sought the opinion of Watergate Special Prosecutor Leon Jaworski regarding how long it be before prosecution of former President Nixon could occur as well as how long it might last. In his response written on September 4, Jaworski outlined the “unprecedented” circumstances surrounding the case. He estimated that the situation would “require a delay before selection of a jury is begun of a period from nine months to a year, and perhaps even longer.”

President Ford also talked about the possibility of a pardon with several key aides: Chief of staff Alexander Haig, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, and Counsellors Robert Hartmann and Jack Marsh. Due to the sensitivity of the topic the discussions were a closely held secret. After considering all of the research and opinions gathered, on September 7 he made the decision to pardon the former President.

Proclamation 4311, Granting Pardon to Richard Nixon, was typed up and placed in this envelope for President Ford to sign during a special announcement on Sunday, September 8, 1974.